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I’m a little oldschool so I log in debian using startx… but for some reason, a few months ago, I lost the french keymap ‘fr’ in tty but not in X11.

If you want to know how to make it work in X11, check out my .xinitrc file.

Otherwise read on.

When I do ‘loadkeys defkeymap’ as root I get : /usr/share/keymaps/i386/qwerty/defkeymap.kmap.gz

Wrong answer when I would be expecting : /usr/share/keymaps/i386/azerty/defkeymap.kmap.gz

So I tried Google… where you are asked to dpkg-reconfigure console-data, console-setup or keyboard-configuration. But it failed for me and quite a few other users…

You know that you’ll have do : ‘loadkeys fr’ after each boot… Soooo… why not add it to /etc/rc.local ? Just before ‘exit 0’…

Reboot… Works like a charm.

Now for some other reason, it seems that if you uninstall console-data (with console-common) there is no more /usr/share/keymaps/ directory… and no more problem either…

So there you have it… 2 ways to bypass the problem permanently.

  1. ~$ apt-get install syslinux (en root)
  2. ~$ isohybrid /chemin_vers/image.iso (en user)
  3. lsblk pour identifier le device cible :
    • ~$ lsblk (en user)
    • Avec comme réponse pour sdb : sdb1, sdb2…
  4. ~$ umount /media/clé_usb (en user) si nécessaire
  5. ~$ dd if=/chemin_vers/image.iso of=/dev/sdb (en root)
    Avec comme résultat ~ :

    • 1435648+0 enregistrements lus
    • 1435648+0 enregistrements écrits
    • 735051776 octets (735 MB) copiés, 143,125 s, 5,1 MB/s
    Attention :

  • La commande dd efface tout donc choisissez bien votre device cible !! (surtout en root)
  • Cette cible, c’est bien le chemin vers la clé usb /dev/sdb et pas une partition /dev/sdb1 ou 2 !!
  • Utilisez une clé de petite capacité (<4Go) car ce n’est pas possible d’y réserver une partition (/dev/sdb2 par exemple) pour y travailler en fat32/ntfs ou ext3/4. Toute la clé sera consacrée au système d’exploitation + boot. Du moins, je n’ai pas réussi à faire autrement… à vous de voir.

deb http://ftp.fr.debian.org/debian/ stable main contrib non-free

deb http://security.debian.org/ stable/updates main contrib non-free

deb http://ftp.fr.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-backports main contrib non-free

# Latest version of Iceweasel :
deb http://mozilla.debian.net/ wheezy-backports iceweasel-release
#apt-get install pkg-mozilla-archive-keyring

deb http://www.deb-multimedia.org stable main non-free
deb http://www.deb-multimedia.org stable-backports main
#apt-get install deb-multimedia-keyring

# With a /etc/apt/apt.conf file, to purge when uninstalling, containing :
# APT::Get::Purge "true";

I just found here a very nice way to change the colors in terminals… All you have to do is add the following line to your ~/.bashrc :

eval `dircolors -b ~/.dircolors`

Then before doing source .bashrc create your ~/.dircolors file with this configuration :

# Dark 256 color solarized theme for the color GNU ls utility.
# Used and tested with dircolors (GNU coreutils) 8.5
#
# @author {@link http://sebastian.tramp.name Sebastian Tramp}
# @license http://sam.zoy.org/wtfpl/ Do What The Fuck You Want To Public License (WTFPL)
#
# More Information at
# https://github.com/seebi/dircolors-solarized
# Term Section
TERM Eterm
TERM ansi
TERM color-xterm
TERM con132x25
TERM con132x30
TERM con132x43
TERM con132x60
TERM con80x25
TERM con80x28
TERM con80x30
TERM con80x43
TERM con80x50
TERM con80x60
TERM cons25
TERM console
TERM cygwin
TERM dtterm
TERM dvtm
TERM dvtm-256color
TERM eterm-color
TERM fbterm
TERM gnome
TERM gnome-256color
TERM jfbterm
TERM konsole
TERM konsole-256color
TERM kterm
TERM linux
TERM linux-c
TERM mach-color
TERM mlterm
TERM putty
TERM putty-256color
TERM rxvt
TERM rxvt-256color
TERM rxvt-cygwin
TERM rxvt-cygwin-native
TERM rxvt-unicode
TERM rxvt-unicode256
TERM rxvt-unicode-256color
TERM screen
TERM screen-16color
TERM screen-16color-bce
TERM screen-16color-s
TERM screen-16color-bce-s
TERM screen-256color
TERM screen-256color-bce
TERM screen-256color-s
TERM screen-256color-bce-s
TERM screen-bce
TERM screen-w
TERM screen.linux
TERM st
TERM st-meta
TERM st-256color
TERM st-meta-256color
TERM vt100
TERM xterm
TERM xterm-16color
TERM xterm-256color
TERM xterm-88color
TERM xterm-color
TERM xterm-debian
TERM xterm-termite
## Documentation
#
# standard colors
#
# Below are the color init strings for the basic file types. A color init
# string consists of one or more of the following numeric codes:
# Attribute codes:
# 00=none 01=bold 04=underscore 05=blink 07=reverse 08=concealed
# Text color codes:
# 30=black 31=red 32=green 33=yellow 34=blue 35=magenta 36=cyan 37=white
# Background color codes:
# 40=black 41=red 42=green 43=yellow 44=blue 45=magenta 46=cyan 47=white
#
#
# 256 color support
# see here: http://www.mail-archive.com/bug-coreutils@gnu.org/msg11030.html)
#
# Text 256 color coding:
# 38;5;COLOR_NUMBER
# Background 256 color coding:
# 48;5;COLOR_NUMBER
## Special files
NORMAL 00;38;5;244 # no color code at all
#FILE 00 # regular file: use no color at all
RESET 0 # reset to « normal » color
DIR 00;38;5;33 # directory 01;34
LINK 00;38;5;37 # symbolic link. (If you set this to ‘target’ instead of a
# numerical value, the color is as for the file pointed to.)
MULTIHARDLINK 00 # regular file with more than one link
FIFO 48;5;230;38;5;136;01 # pipe
SOCK 48;5;230;38;5;136;01 # socket
DOOR 48;5;230;38;5;136;01 # door
BLK 48;5;230;38;5;244;01 # block device driver
CHR 48;5;230;38;5;244;01 # character device driver
ORPHAN 48;5;235;38;5;160 # symlink to nonexistent file, or non-stat’able file
SETUID 48;5;160;38;5;230 # file that is setuid (u+s)
SETGID 48;5;136;38;5;230 # file that is setgid (g+s)
CAPABILITY 30;41 # file with capability
STICKY_OTHER_WRITABLE 48;5;64;38;5;230 # dir that is sticky and other-writable (+t,o+w)
OTHER_WRITABLE 48;5;235;38;5;33 # dir that is other-writable (o+w) and not sticky
STICKY 48;5;33;38;5;230 # dir with the sticky bit set (+t) and not other-writable
# This is for files with execute permission:
EXEC 00;38;5;64
## Archives or compressed (violet + bold for compression)
.tar 00;38;5;61
.tgz 00;38;5;61
.arj 00;38;5;61
.taz 00;38;5;61
.lzh 00;38;5;61
.lzma 00;38;5;61
.tlz 00;38;5;61
.txz 00;38;5;61
.zip 00;38;5;61
.z 00;38;5;61
.Z 00;38;5;61
.dz 00;38;5;61
.gz 00;38;5;61
.lz 00;38;5;61
.xz 00;38;5;61
.bz2 00;38;5;61
.bz 00;38;5;61
.tbz 00;38;5;61
.tbz2 00;38;5;61
.tz 00;38;5;61
.deb 00;38;5;61
.rpm 00;38;5;61
.jar 00;38;5;61
.rar 00;38;5;61
.ace 00;38;5;61
.zoo 00;38;5;61
.cpio 00;38;5;61
.7z 00;38;5;61
.rz 00;38;5;61
.apk 00;38;5;61
.gem 00;38;5;61
# Image formats (yellow)
.jpg 00;38;5;136
.JPG 00;38;5;136 #stupid but needed
.jpeg 00;38;5;136
.gif 00;38;5;136
.bmp 00;38;5;136
.pbm 00;38;5;136
.pgm 00;38;5;136
.ppm 00;38;5;136
.tga 00;38;5;136
.xbm 00;38;5;136
.xpm 00;38;5;136
.tif 00;38;5;136
.tiff 00;38;5;136
.png 00;38;5;136
.PNG 00;38;5;136
.svg 00;38;5;136
.svgz 00;38;5;136
.mng 00;38;5;136
.pcx 00;38;5;136
.dl 00;38;5;136
.xcf 00;38;5;136
.xwd 00;38;5;136
.yuv 00;38;5;136
.cgm 00;38;5;136
.emf 00;38;5;136
.eps 00;38;5;136
.CR2 00;38;5;136
.ico 00;38;5;136
# Files of special interest (base1)
.tex 00;38;5;245
.rdf 00;38;5;245
.owl 00;38;5;245
.n3 00;38;5;245
.ttl 00;38;5;245
.nt 00;38;5;245
.torrent 00;38;5;245
.xml 00;38;5;245
*Makefile 00;38;5;245
*Rakefile 00;38;5;245
*build.xml 00;38;5;245
*rc 00;38;5;245
*1 00;38;5;245
.nfo 00;38;5;245
*README 00;38;5;245
*README.txt 00;38;5;245
*readme.txt 00;38;5;245
.md 00;38;5;245
*README.markdown 00;38;5;245
.ini 00;38;5;245
.yml 00;38;5;245
.cfg 00;38;5;245
.conf 00;38;5;245
.c 00;38;5;245
.cpp 00;38;5;245
.cc 00;38;5;245
.sqlite 00;38;5;245
# « unimportant » files as logs and backups (base01)
.log 00;38;5;240
.bak 00;38;5;240
.aux 00;38;5;240
.lof 00;38;5;240
.lol 00;38;5;240
.lot 00;38;5;240
.out 00;38;5;240
.toc 00;38;5;240
.bbl 00;38;5;240
.blg 00;38;5;240
*~ 00;38;5;240
*# 00;38;5;240
.part 00;38;5;240
.incomplete 00;38;5;240
.swp 00;38;5;240
.tmp 00;38;5;240
.temp 00;38;5;240
.o 00;38;5;240
.pyc 00;38;5;240
.class 00;38;5;240
.cache 00;38;5;240
# Audio formats (orange)
.aac 00;38;5;166
.au 00;38;5;166
.flac 00;38;5;166
.mid 00;38;5;166
.midi 00;38;5;166
.mka 00;38;5;166
.mp3 00;38;5;166
.mpc 00;38;5;166
.ogg 00;38;5;166
.ra 00;38;5;166
.wav 00;38;5;166
.m4a 00;38;5;166
# http://wiki.xiph.org/index.php/MIME_Types_and_File_Extensions
.axa 00;38;5;166
.oga 00;38;5;166
.spx 00;38;5;166
.xspf 00;38;5;166
# Video formats (as audio + bold)
.mov 00;38;5;166
.mpg 00;38;5;166
.mpeg 00;38;5;166
.m2v 00;38;5;166
.mkv 00;38;5;166
.ogm 00;38;5;166
.mp4 00;38;5;166
.m4v 00;38;5;166
.mp4v 00;38;5;166
.vob 00;38;5;166
.qt 00;38;5;166
.nuv 00;38;5;166
.wmv 00;38;5;166
.asf 00;38;5;166
.rm 00;38;5;166
.rmvb 00;38;5;166
.flc 00;38;5;166
.avi 00;38;5;166
.fli 00;38;5;166
.flv 00;38;5;166
.gl 00;38;5;166
.m2ts 00;38;5;166
.divx 00;38;5;166
.webm 00;38;5;166
# http://wiki.xiph.org/index.php/MIME_Types_and_File_Extensions
.axv 00;38;5;166
.anx 00;38;5;166
.ogv 00;38;5;166
.ogx 00;38;5;166

It doesn’t seem to work properly in urxvt but since I only work in screen where it does like a charm… I’m delighted… Just make sure you’ve got in your ~/.bash_aliases something like :

alias ls=’ls –color=tty -F -b -a -T 0′

As root :
vim /etc/hostname : change localhost to debian for example.
Do the same here : vim /etc/hosts (to anything that would have localhost in its name).
And finally : /etc/init.d/hostname.sh start
When you’ll reboot, the changes will have taken place.

I spent a little time trying to figure out how to configure my new Canon i-SENSYS LBP6020B with my Debian/testing. Now I know, it won’t work ! I thought I should share the info…
I was fooled by the supposedly working drivers for 64-bit systems available on Canon’s official site. If you download the archive you will find both i386 and amd64 drivers but only the i386 version will print. Your printer will seem to work but will stay silent without any error message, even if you install the right way the amd64 driver.

For your information the following is the right way (at least a successful one on i386 -change the .deb package names) :

ls /dev/usb/ # gives lp0 if printer is on

as root :

mkdir /var/ccpd
mkfifo /var/ccpd/fifo0

dpkg -i cndrvcups-common_2.60-1_amd64.deb
dpkg -i cndrvcups-capt_2.60-1_amd64.deb

chmod 777 /var/ccpd/fifo0
chown -R lp:lp /var/ccpd

service cups stop
service cups start
service ccpd stop

/usr/sbin/lpadmin -p LBP6020B -m CNCUPSLBP6020CAPTK.ppd -v ccp:/var/ccpd/fifo0 -E
/usr/sbin/ccpdadmin -p LBP6020B -o /dev/usb/lp0

/etc/init.d/ccpd start

Check http://localhost:631/ to see if everything is alright…

As I said, these operations will not be working with the amd64 drivers unless you hack your system doing things like what’s explained on this page :
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CanonCaptDrv190
Scroll down to : Known Issues/64-bit Systems… At this time, there is no way to install the i386 packages required on Debian/testing to follow these steps…
It’s a known 64-bit bug that doesn’t seem to bother Canon when asked about it…

So… My father will soon have a beautiful brand new Canon to print his Bridge stats… and I will not buy anything else from Canon because of their lack of consideration.

Edit, september 23rd : Just recieved a Dell B1165nfw and taking it out of the box took me longer than installing it… and getting it to work ! The 64-bit driver available on Dell’s site works like a charm…

For some reason fdisk -l as root doesn’t show my Samsung Galaxy Ace anymore…
[Android 2.3.6 and Kernel 2.6.35.7 with Linux debian 3.12-1-686-pae #1 SMP Debian 3.12.6-2 (2013-12-29) i686 GNU/Linux]
Usually I have to go through this step in order to mount the device once back in user mode…
But now I must run fdisk -l /dev/sdb in order to show :
/dev/sdb1 8192 7954431 3973120 b W95 FAT32
Then, and only then, can I exit root and mount the device as user with a simple mount /media/vfat/